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Jesmond Gardens

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Assessment

This page is divided into three sections.

Assessment at Key Stage 1.

Assessment at Key Stage 2

New assessment procedures - for all year groups that have been in place since September 2014.

 

Key Stage 1 Assessment

 

At the end of each stage teachers are required to undertake both formal and informal assessments of the progress made by pupils. The informal testing is known as TEACHER ASSESSMENT, and is an important part of the process because it uses judgements made from on-going assessments, taken over the whole academic year.

Teachers, in fact, make informal assessments every time they teach a class, and they will use these judgements to plan what the children need to learn next. The formal tests are known as Standard Assessment Tests, (SATs) which are produced nationally and are taken by all children in the country. From 2016 the tests for both key stages have changed.

To help parents, we have created a power point to give detail about the new testing and assessment arrangements. Please click here to access.

Additional information is also below with links to example tests. There is a further guide produced by Rising Stars which support parents with work at home at home. Click here to access.

If parents wish, there is also a copy of the interim assessment standards which children will be assessed against. Click here to access. It is worth looking at these documents so you can see the new expectations for your child. Though children do take tests at KS1 they are combined with teachers own knowledge as to take a test result only for a child as young as 7 would not be appropriate. Children also take the tests in comfortable conditions and often in small groups.

At Key Stage 1 children have tests as follows:

Maths

- Paper 1 – Arithmetic
- Paper 2 - Reasoning

Reading using a reading booklet and an answer book

Spelling Punctuation and Grammar is tested by a test paper

Writing is assessed by teachers (click here to see the published interim standards for writing)

How is the school helping to prepare the children?

- By practising key skills, which will prepare the children for the process of the tests.
- By giving parents the information they need to help their child
- By using revision materials – booklets, homework, BBC bitesize programmes
- Through class lessons, making sure the children have covered all of the areas tested.

 

Key Stage 2 Assessment

 

At the end of each stage teachers are required to undertake both formal and informal assessments of the progress made by pupils. The informal testing is known as TEACHER ASSESSMENT, and is an important part of the process because it uses judgements made from on-going assessments, taken over the whole academic year. Teachers, in fact, make informal assessments every time they teach a class, and they will use these judgements to plan what the children need to learn next. The formal tests are known as Standard Assessment Tests, (SATs) which are produced nationally and are taken by all children in the country. From 2016 the tests for both key stages have changed.

To help parents, we have created a power point to give detail about the new testing and assessment arrangements. Please click here to access.

Additional information is also below with links to example tests. There is a further guide produced by Rising Stars which support parents with work at home at home. Click here to access.

If parents wish, there is also a copy of the interim assessment standards which children will be assessed against. It is worth looking at these documents so you can see the new expectations for your child. Click here to access.

At Key Stage 2 children are tested as follows:

Maths is tested by 3 papers:

  • Paper 1 – Arithmetic
  • Paper 2 - Reasoning
  • Paper 3 - Reasoning

Reading is tested using a reading booklet and an answer book

Spelling Punctuation and Grammar is tested by a test paper

Writing is assessed by teachers (click here to see the published interim standards for writing)

The timetable for the tests changes from year to year but the tests must be administered according to the national plans, unless special circumstances prevail.

All of the test papers are marked externally. For 2016 it is expected that we will receive marks for the children but it may take some time before we know what they mean in terms of reaching the expected standard. We endeavour to process the information as quickly as possible and get it out to you in written form as part of the annual report. If we spot a discrepancy in the marking we can resubmit it for re-marking by another examiner, but this delays the process.

Special arrangements

We are able to make special arrangements for some pupils according to their ability. Some children are entitled to additional time for some tests, if we suspect that they would suffer unduly and be unable to concentrate. For others, who find reading takes longer, additional time will accommodate this problem. Some children may have an adult ‘reader’ or ‘scribe’ for some tests – obviously reading and writing tests are exempt! We will discuss the needs of your child with you so that you know the arrangements, which are in place. Children with scribes and readers will take the test in another room, where other children cannot be either disturbed or given help with the test.

Equipment

The school provides all the equipment the children need.

How is the school helping to prepare the children?

  • By practising key skills, which will prepare the children for the process of the tests.
  • By giving parents the information they need to help their child
  • By using revision materials – booklets, homework, BBC bitesize programmes
  • Through class lessons, making sure the children have covered all of the areas tested.

How can I help my child?

  • Make sure you know what homework has been set and that it is done thoroughly
  • Don’t panic – don’t transfer your anxieties to your child
  • Make sure they have all of the things they need for school
  • Help with revision – reading, speed maths, writing, comprehension
  • Purchasing revision materials/CD ROMs
  • Early nights and a ‘normal’ routine.

NB: if a child is unable to attend school either through illness or another reason accepted by the Board, it is the responsibility of the Head Teacher to make arrangements for children to take the tests off site under the same conditions. A responsible adult, unrelated to the child, may transport the papers and administer the tests. The head must be satisfied that no information has been given to the child, which would compromise the confidential nature of the tests.

 

New Assessment Procedures

 

Assessment has changed since the introduction of the new national curriculum in September 2014. The level system that many parents and children were familiar with has been replaced with “Assessment without levels” or AWL.

The government has expected all school’s to develop their own assessment systems and not provided any guidance on what these systems should look like.

Most Hartlepool Schools have adopted a system that has been developed by Hartlepool primary teachers. Unfortunately, we cannot upload these documents to the website but if anyone would like a copy of them, please do ask at reeption and we will provide them to you free of charge.

The new national curriculum has set out additional knowledge and skills for children to learn but also raised the standard expected at the end of every year.

This has had an impact on all children but it also depends on which year group children are in.

What follows is a generalisation for all children in KS2 but in general terms: -

  • Children who reached the old standard of level 3 at KS1 (which was above), will find their child now reaching the expected standard or in some cases below.
  • Children who reached the old standard of 2A and 2B will now be working below the new standards.
  • Children who attained 2C or below will not be reaching expected standards.

Teachers are working very hard with their children to “close the gaps” between the old curriculum and the new but children are now covering more curriculum content than previously expected. There are additions to the curriculum such as algebra and Roman numerals in KS2.

Until current year 6 children take the new SAT tests this summer 2016 and until the government decide where the pass mark is (something they won’t do until after the tests have been marked), it is difficult to know where the new standards are. However, many educationalists are suggesting that the old level 5 which only 30 – 40 % of children passed is more likely to be the standard expected of all children.

So, where does this leave us at Jesmond Gardens and you as parents?

  • All parents will see a “dip” in your child’s assessment. At present we have no children exceeding the new standards
  • Parents of children who were told their child is “average” may now find that they are below the expected standard

All of this is hard for you as parents but also for your children.

There are many websites that have lots of information for parents on the new assessment procedures. I haven’t found a particular one that I can recommend but here is an example one.

If you want to know more about what is expected at the end of KS1 and KS2 in the tests please click here for Key Stage 1 and here for Key Stage 2. These links will take you to another page on our website.